Sessions

Workshop 1:
More vulnerable, less acknowledged: The Prevalence of ACEs and Tools for Tailoring Protective Factors for children with developmental disabilities

Title: More vulnerable, less acknowledged: The Prevalence of ACEs and Tools for Tailoring Protective Factors for children with developmental disabilities

 

Presenters: Amy Moseley and Kate Chappell

Settings: Early Care and Education, Family-to-Family Support, Family Engagement

Targeted Protective Factors: Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need

 

 

Workshop Description:

This session for early childhood educators examines statistical findings on the risk and predictive factors of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE’s) for families of children with developmental disabilities and identifies evidence-based strategies for maltreatment response and prevention strategies that strengthen families by tailoring the approach to building protective factors. Participants will receive tools and tactics to apply these strategies in the classroom and in family engagement.

 

About the Presenters:

Amy Moseley coordinates the activities of the South Carolina Child Well-Being Coalition and manages the community coalition and parent advisory work for Children's Trust of South Carolina. She has a BA in counseling and Bible from Southern Methodist College and a MA in counseling from Trevecca Nazerene University, Amy has served children and families in South Carolina, Pennsylvania and Tennessee through direct service and program management in the fields of foster care, sexual assault, disability and maternal-infant health. Amy is a certified trainer in protective factors through the National Alliance of Children’s Trust and Prevention Funds, an ACE Interface master trainer.

 

Kate Chappell is a Clinical Associate Professor with The University of South Carolina College of Nursing. She earned her BS and MS degrees in Nursing from The University of South Carolina. She has been a forensic medical provider in the SC Children’s Advocacy Medical Response System network since 2011. She is a Fellow in the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. A Ph.D. candidate in Nursing, her research is focused on prevention of child maltreatment with a particular interest in caregiver vigilance for child sexual abuse.

Workshop 2:
Social Emotional Toolkit for Families

Presenter: Carrie Trivedi and Kerri Kannengieser

Settings: Early Care and Education, Family-to-Family Support, Home Visiting Programs

Targeted Protective Factors: Social Connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Social and emotional competence of children

 

 

Workshop Description:

This session will use multiple modes of instruction to help participants learn about strategies and resources available to assist families in promoting social emotional development and positive child outcomes.  Through Powerpoint, small/large group discussion and hands on activities, participants will come away with an understanding of how to set families of young children up for success.

 

About the Presenters:

Carrie Trivedi is the Program Coordinator for the South Carolina Child Care Inclusion Collaborative.  She holds a Bachelors in Experimental Psychology and a Masters of Arts in Teaching in Early Childhood Education from the University of South Carolina.  She has worked in the field for over 15 years.  During her years in the classroom, she taught Kindergarten and Pre-Kindergarten in Title I schools in the Columbia area.

 

Kerri Kannengieser is the Program Coordinator for South Carolina Partnerships for Inclusion.  She holds an M.Ed. in Special Education and has 15 years of experience in the field.  For 10 of these years, she worked directly with children as a special education teacher in New York. 

Workshop 3:
Opioids: Increasing Family Capacity through the Protective Factors, Part One

Presenters: Michelle Grego Cunningham and Lorraine Cragan-Sullivan

Settings: Early Care and Education, Family-to-Family Support, Home Visiting Programs 

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental Resilience, Social Connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need

 

Workshop Description:

Using the Protective Factors Framework, this two-part session will identify opportunities to mitigate the impact of opioid exposure on children and enhance the capacity of professionals to assist caregivers.  Four of the five protective factors; parental resilience, knowledge of parenting and child development, social connections, and concrete supports in times of need, will be highlighted and explored through a lens of adversity and resiliency.  Throughout the session, learners will be provided opportunities to develop protective factor implementation plans in their work.   

Part1: Parental Resilience and Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

 

About the Presenters:

Michelle Greco Cunningham received a BA in Sociology from the University of Connecticut, a BSN from the University of North Carolina Charlotte and a post- baccalaureate certificate in Child Advocacy Studies from USC Upstate.  She is certified in Maternal Newborn Nursing, Child Birth Education and is a Certified Trainer for the National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children and ACE Master Trainer.  She is employed by Prisma Health-Upstate in the Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Health & Advocacy and serves as the Program Manager for Managing Abstinence in Newborns (MAiN) and Manager of Child Abuse Prevention.

 

Lorraine Cragan-Sullivan has over 20 year of experience working with children and families in diverse settings.  She received her Bachelor and Master degrees in psychology from Marist College and Master of Social Work degree from the University at Albany.  Lorraine is employed by Prisma Health-Upstate in the Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Health & Advocacy and serves as Program Coordinator-Upstate Outreach for Help Me Grow South Carolina. She is a certified trainer in the Strengthening Families’ Protective Factor Framework and the CDC’s Act Early Ambassador to South Carolina.

Workshop 4:
Connecting with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families

Presenter: Lydia Carnesale

Settings: Early Care and Education, Home Visiting Program

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental resilience, Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need, Social and emotional competence of children

 

Workshop Description:

Participants will be able to identify and understand their role when working with culturally and linguistically diverse families. Information on how to connect and support familial connections will be shared. This workshop will foster understanding of the importance of maintaining a home language for healthy growth and development of children and families. Participants will be given resources to use with families.

 

About the Presenter:

Lydia Carnesale is a mother of three, a Doctoral Student and Homles Scholar with USC and the Educational Coordinator for Richland County First Steps. Her research focuses on students and families who are culturally and linguistically diverse within South Carolina. She is interested in understanding how professionals are being prepared to respond to these young learners and their families. A second interest is exploring how families engage the educational world that their children are navigating. As a Holmes Scholar, Lydia primarily supports activities related to the Parent Advocacy Group.  At RCFS she supports both Family Services Advocates and Classroom Caregivers.

Workshop 5:
Using the Protective Factors Framework to Strengthen Families Impacted by the Foster Care System

Presenters: Kim Perry

Settings: All Service Providers working with Families

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental resilience, Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need, Social and emotional competence of children

 

 

Workshop Description:

This information session will highlight the Assessment Center’s (AC) approach to promoting protective factors with families experiencing the crisis of foster care entry. The AC brings together key partners to provide trauma-informed needs assessments for families that emphasize the protective factors. Children receive initial medical, mental health, and developmental assessments while their families are invited to participate in comprehensive assessments that are designed to elicit strengths and barriers specific to the protective factors.

 

About the Presenter:

Kim Perry is director of the Assessment Center (AC) at Pendleton Place. She is a licensed clinical social worker and provides leadership, coordination, on-going implementation, and oversight for the AC program. The AC program seeks to improve continuity of care, maintenance of family connections, and the utilization of comprehensive evaluations to improve child and family well-being. The AC offers comprehensive services for families impacted by entry into foster care. She is proud to be a part of an innovative approach to working with families that is grounded in strengths-based and trauma-informed practices that promote the protective factors.

Workshop 6:
The Meta-Play Method & Dynamic Behavior Theory of Autism (DBTA)

Presenter: Erin Tyler

Settings: Early Care and Education, Home Visiting Programs

Targeted Protective Factors: Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Social and emotional competence of children

 

 

Workshop Description:

The Meta-Play Method offers a systematic approach to fostering the development of imagination and play skills in young children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), intellectual disabilities, developmental delays, and social and emotional disabilities. By creating meaningful and purposeful play for young learners with disabilities, the Meta-Play Method provides educators, practitioners, and families with a comprehensive play-based curriculum that systematically fosters the development of imaginative thinking, pretend play, and age-appropriate social skills.    Individuals diagnosed with autism or who display characteristics of autism might experience meta-representational failure. Based on Dynamic Behavior Theory of Autism (DBTA), early treatment should focus on interventions that promote object-to-person interest and focus on part- to whole-object thinking, combined with meta-representational thinking and imagination.     Through video modeling, overview, and small group discussion, participants will learn how the Meta-Play Method is based on four pillars: object-to-person, the transition from part-to-whole, activities that foster imagination, and the absence of control and predictability. It is designed to shift attention and identification from objects to people, engage the child in activities that encourage meta-representational thinking, build tolerance for unpredictability, and increase understanding of whole versus parts. 

 

About the Presenter:

Erin Tyler is the Lead National Education Consultant for TeachTown. She provides exceptional educational opportunities for all students and supports educational improvement through the use of evidence-based methodologies and the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. Previously, Tyler was a Behavior Consultant for Shelby County/ Memphis City Schools where she supported school-based and district staff in the implementation of positive behavior supports within the school setting as well as provide trainings focused on antecedent strategies, behavioral interventions, positive reinforcement and crisis management.

Workshop 7:
Opioids: Increasing Family Capacity through the Protective Factors, Part Two

Presenters: Michelle Grego Cunningham and Lorraine Cragan-Sullivan

Settings: Early Care and Education, Family-to-Family Support, Home Visiting Programs 

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental Resilience, Social Connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need

 

 

Workshop Description:

Using the Protective Factors Framework, this two-part session will identify opportunities to mitigate the impact of opioid exposure on children and enhance the capacity of professionals to assist caregivers.  Four of the five protective factors; parental resilience, knowledge of parenting and child development, social connections, and concrete supports in times of need, will be highlighted and explored through a lens of adversity and resiliency.  Throughout the session, learners will be provided opportunities to develop protective factor implementation plans in their work.

Part Two: Social Connection and Concrete Support in Times of Need

Workshop 8:
3 Ways to Foster Meaningful Connection

Presenter: Alek Reaves

Settings: Early Care and Education, Family-to-Family Support

Targeted Protective Factors: Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development

 

 

Workshop Description:

This session will provide a space for participants to discuss child sexual development, how to nurture their development, and how to foster a meaningful connection using three techniques that can be modeled in the home and classroom. Using this analysis, participants will examine the impact of language and messages received about sexuality. Using multidisciplinary research, this session will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to nurture healthy sexual development by providing accurate, non-shaming, and developmentally appropriate information about sexuality.

 

About the Presenter:

Alek Reaves is the Elementary Education Coordinator at Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands. Alek is an experienced presenter, having lead sessions at the Women’s Health Forum and Palmetto Association for Children and Families. In her current role, she provides primary prevention education to youth and their families throughout the midlands. She passionately believes in adult responsibility for the safety of children, as well as supporting parents in having ongoing, age appropriate conversations. Through community partnerships and public awareness, she hopes to promote healthy childhood development so children can thrive and be protected from experiencing abuse.

Workshop 9:
Implementing Circles in Your Community to Lift Children and Parents out of Poverty

Presenters: Sandra Bullock and Stella Hill-McBee

Settings: Family-to-Family Support

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental resilience, Social connections, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need, Social and emotional competence of children

 

Workshop Description:

The Circles model is a two-generation approach to ending poverty for the family. It incorporates the Protective Factors Framework. This is a community-initiative that involves volunteers and service partners. Circles’ secret is matching two community volunteers with each family while they make an 18 to 24 months-long commitment to help the parents and children reach tier goals to exit poverty.

Workshop 10:
Building Positive Relationships and Creating Supportive Environments with Children and Families

Presenter: Angela Compton and Lynn Kuykendall

Settings: Early Care and Education, Home Visiting Programs

Targeted Protective Factors: Social connections, Social and emotional competence of children

 

 

Workshop Description:

This interactive session will address the impact and importance of building positive relationships with every child and family, Participants will learn about the relationship between environmental variables, children’s challenging behaviors, and social emotional development. Strategies to build relationships with children and families, design and create supporting environments, and ways to acknowledge and encourage positive social behaviors will be identified. Throughout the session, the focus will be on prevention and teaching appropriate skills as participants reflect on their work with children and families and generate strategies for promoting social development for every child in their care.  

 

About the Presenter:

Angela Compton is an education associate with the South Carolina Department of Education’s Office of Early Learning and Literacy.  Angela is a life-long educator and learner who collaborates with CERDEP districts, schools and teachers, inspiring and empowering educators through supportive coaching, training, and feedback in the implementation of best practices.    Before joining the Office of Early Learning and Literacy, Angela served as an instructional coach with Laurens District 55 and a facilitator for the Read to Succeed courses through the University of South Carolina.  These roles allowed her the opportunity to collaborate, support and coach administrators and teachers (Pre-K-Secondary) in the understanding and implementation of best practices as well as in the use of data to inform instruction; allowing her to contribute to improving teacher practice and fostering student growth. She is passionate about igniting a spark and instilling a love of learning in every child!    In her spare time, she enjoys running, attending Clemson football games, working on the farm, and writing. In the future, she aspires to write a children’s book and compete in a half-marathon.  Angela’s educational background includes a master’s degree in Language and Literacy from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor of science in Elementary Education from Winthrop University. 

 

About the Presenters:

Lynn Kuykendall is an education associate with the South Carolina Department of Education’s Office of Early Learning and Literacy.  In this role, she supports CERDEP districts, schools and teachers as they implement best practices in early childhood classrooms and provides coaching, training, and feedback as needed.     Prior to joining the Office of Early Learning and Literacy, Lynn served as a regional master teacher with the South Carolina Department of Education. In that role, she was responsible for supporting schools and districts in the implementation of school improvement models, collaborating with and coaching district and school-level leadership regarding all aspects of implementation and evaluation of professional growth for teachers and assisting school leadership teams in designing comprehensive human capital management systems.    Lynn earned her bachelor of science in Early Childhood Education from Lander University and a master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from the University of South Carolina. In addition, she earned National Board Certification as an Early Childhood Generalist. 

Workshop 11:
Becoming Trauma Informed

Presenter: Jennifer Szalwinski

Settings: Early Care and Education

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental resilience, Knowledge of parenting and child development, Concrete supports in times of need

 

Workshop Description:

We have a responsibility to educate every single child who enters our classroom and every classroom should be a safe place to live, learn, develop and meet high academic standards. Having an understanding of students and their families is essential in building the classroom culture and meaningful relationships needed to maintain that responsibility. Trauma is prevalent and Adverse Childhood Experiences effect how student and families engage in the classroom and with schools. This session will provide the fundamental building blocks to a trauma-informed classroom and school.

 

About the Presenter:

 Jenny Szalwinski is the Assistant Director of the Center of Excellence to Prepare Teachers of Children of Poverty. She is a life-long learner with over 10 years of experience. She is a member of the first cohort who completed the four graduate courses that lead to South Carolina's Add-On Certification for Teachers of Children of Poverty.   As Assistant Director, Szalwinski's goals are to build strong relationships with educators around the state and to use the Center's resources to provide long-term support for them.  She also will strive to instill a sense of urgency in leaders around the state for this important work.  

Workshop 12:
Keys to Communicating with Parents

Presenter: Bonnye Peebles

Settings: Early Care and Education

Targeted Protective Factors: Parental resilience, Social connections, Social and emotional competence of children

 

Workshop Description:

Communication is a vital part of ensuring that the care and education of young children is being met. The goal is to communicate with families in an open and responsive manner as a partner. A true partnership combines the strengths of both parents and caregivers to create something that neither could do alone. Caring for young children is not always easy, but the rewards can be as great as the challenges. Building partnerships with families is also a challenge, but children come to your program as part of a family. To be effective with children caregivers must recognize the importance of being connected with their families.  In this session we will explore strategies to build solid communication pathways with families and methods that caregivers can implement to build this communication.

 

About the Presenter:

Bonnye Peebles has been in Early Childhood Education for 33 years working in various childcare areas including classroom teacher of all ages, assistant director and curriculum coordinator.   She attended the University of South Carolina for her BA degree in Social Studies and Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education and South Carolina State University for her teaching certification.   She lives with her husband in Chapin and is a mother of two daughters and has 2 grandchildren. Currently she is a Quality Coach for South Carolina Child Care Resource and Referral.

Afternoon Featured Speaker Dr. Gerard Costa:
Relating at the Speed of Trust: Becoming Authentically Present with Families

Title: Relating at the Speed of Trust: Becoming Authentically Present with Families

 

 

Afternoon Keynote Description:

What families need most from us is to feel safe and listened to! This presentation will describe a way of thinking about our "professional FORMATION" - the idea that we who work with infants, children and families must pay attention to our own personal growth and 'inner lives". In our relationships with families we must become aware of our tendency to "have an agenda" and instead learn to follow the lead of the families with whom we work.  Ways of "knowing", "doing" and "being" will be described, and the critical importance of not only what we say and do, but "how we are" with families will be examined.  Becoming "present" helps us be open to ourselves and our families as we support them in their journey as parents and caregivers.